Naufrage d'une cathédrale de la mer

Nous apprenons ce matin le naufrage au large du Brésil du grand voilier école CONCORDIA dont le port d'attache était Lunenburg en Nouvelle-Écosse. Tous sont sains et saufs mais il s'agit tout de même d'une perte importante pour le patrimoine maritime.

www.radio-canada.ca[...]e.shtml

L'équipage
19 fév. 2010
20 fév. 2010
0

bonjour tosse-mer,
il semblerai que les spécialistes des vieux gréments soient aux abonés absents......
fortune de mer pourrait on dire, erreur du patron? à en croire l'article on peut se poser des questions.
dans tous les cas, c'est toujours dommage de voir un bateau sombrer petit ou grand.

20 fév. 2010
0

plus sur ce lien
www.theglobeandmail.com[...]473951/

c'était un bateau mais un bateau en acier de 1992, beaucoup d'étudiants à bord qui effectuaient un tdm mais continuaient à étudier

c'est évidemment tres dommage car il faut des passionnés pour permettee à des grands voilers de naviguer

20 fév. 2010
0

CONCORDIA
C'est une grande perte. Heureusement sans pertes humaines.

Le commentaire sur le site est d'une affligeante co...rie et montre l'incompétence de son auteur.

Avec mes regrets.

JP L

20 fév. 2010
0

Chavirage
Apparemment chavirage :
news.globaltv.com[...]ry.html

Un peu surprenant car l'article parle de creux de 2,5 m à 3 m, pas la tempête du siècle.
Les occupants ont eu le temps de mettre leur combinaison de survie et les radeaux et rescue boat ont bien fonctionné....

Un peu bizarre quand même, notamment confirmé par un commentaire en fin d'article.

20 fév. 2010
0

Bizarre en effet ce naufrage
Mais puisque tous sont sains et saufs nous ne tarderons pas à avoir des témoignages et une explication sur ce qui s'est passé au large.

Je vous mettrai un lien dès que les médias d'ici rapporteront l'explication de l'équipage.

20 fév. 2010
0

remarque en passant
la flottabilité d'une cathédrale laisse souvent à désirer!

22 fév. 2010
0

Des nouvelles...
... des causes de ce chavirage ? Bizarre quand mêm, il n' y avait pas des conditions si terribles pour un bateau comme ça ?....
A+ Sergio

22 fév. 2010
0

Voici quelques détails
Article 1
William Curry of Seattle, the ship's captain was in his cabin when he felt the severe heel. His first thought, he recounted, was that it was "pretty normal."
Then, however, the ship kept being pushed further over, and "I knew instantly that it was not right."
Mr. Curry said he had seen bad weather coming -- gale or near-gale winds with thundershowers and high seas. In preparation, he had lowered some of the tall ship's 16 sails, trimmed others, notified the cooks to prepare sandwiches in case thr rolling seas made cooking impossible, and notified the students. Although bad weather was coming, Mr. Curry thought what lay ahead was nothing terribly special: discomforting but not threatening.
Instead, he said, the ship was struck by a micro-burst of a vertical downdraft.
Normally, heavy horizontal winds will cause a sailing boat to heel thereby putting the sails at an angle to spill some of the wind, he explained. A downdraft, by contrast, takes a sail already an angle and pushes it further down, which was Concordia's fate. "The more you go over, the more the sail is exposed to the wind," he said. It was an "extraordinary event," of "bad luck" such that within 15 minutes the ship was over on its side and slowly disappeared.

Article 2
RIO DE JANEIRO — When wind and rough seas drove the Canadian sailing ship carrying dozens of teenage students to lean precariously to one side, the captain figured it was just another day of sailing in rough weather.

When the boat immediately keeled again, he knew it was going down.

"The ship had gone from sailing upright to being on her side in the water in about 15 or 20 seconds," William Curry said. "I knew, of course, that the blow to the ship was fatal and that she was not going to right."

Just like that, a five-month academic dream cruise for 64 young students and crew ended in a mad scramble for life rafts as the SV Concordia was quickly sucked beneath the waves. Back on land Saturday, they recounted how fears of starvation and a lonely death far from land filled their heads during two nightmarish days adrift at sea.

Curry called it a miracle that everyone on board made it into rafts and survived after the three-masted Concordia apparently experienced a weather phenomenon known as a "microburst" — a sudden, violent downdraft of wind — that instantly crippled the vessel Wednesday.

The gust that knocked the ship on its side came so suddenly therewas no time to radio for help before all communications equipment was submerged and ruined. So hope rested on a distress beacon that launched automatically when the vessel capsized.

"My biggest fear was that nobody knew we had sunk," said 17-year-old Keaton Farwell of Toronto. "We thought our signal had failed and nobody knew and it could be weeks before we were saved. The worst life-and-death thoughts were going through our heads, and everybody was panicking."

After 30 hours in life rafts 300 miles (480 kilometers) off Brazil, hope arrived as "a light in the sky" — a Brazilian air force jet flying high overhead sent to search the area after the beacon was finally detected.

"When we saw the plane, we were crying because of happiness. We knew somebody was coming for us, we knew we weren't going to die in a life raft," Farwell said.

Brazil's navy said the distress signal was first picked up about 5 p.m. Thursday, and an air force plane later the spotted rafts. Passing merchant ships plucked the castaways from the water, and by Saturday afternoon they were all back on land in Rio de Janeiro.

The first to dock looked disheveled and teary-eyed, wearing navy caps and clothing borrowed from their rescuers. They smiled brightly at times, but also broke down and cried as they spoke to reporters on the navy frigate that brought them to port.

Curry said the Concordia's crew had begun preparing 24 hours in advance after getting a forecast of rough weather and high seas, but nothing unusual.

"Those conditions are not at all extreme. It's kind of just another day at sea," Curry said. "It was an extraordinary event — just bad luck to be in that tiny patch of ocean at that time."

While his young charges receive extensive sailing training as part of the study program, luck also had a hand in keeping everyone alive.

The storm hit inthe early afternoon at a time when most of the students were studying in protected structures on deck — which made it easier for them to scramble to life rafts.

Two rafts got tangled in the rigging — but the ship's cook had rushed so quickly from her chores that she was still clutching a kitchen knife, which was used to slice through the ropes and free the rafts.

Curry also said the school that operates the ship outfitted it with twice as many life rafts as actually needed for 64 people, so there was plenty of room for everyone even though all the rafts on one side were under water.

The 188-foot (57.5-meter) Concordia was carrying 48 students plus the crew, according to Kate Knight, head of West Island College International of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, which operates the Class Afloat program for students in the final two years of high school and the first year of college.

School officials said 42 of those aboard were from Canada. Knight said others hail from the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Europe and the West Indies.

Nigel McCarthy, president and CEO of the school, said a London-based maritime agency would conduct an investigation to determine why it took so long for the emergency beacon to be heard.

"I'm concerned, I'm concerned," he told The Associated Press. "Obviously we don't know the reality of what's happened at every stage of this process, and we're just thankful to the Brazilian navy for having gone and got them."

Katherine Irwin, a 16-year-old from Calgary, Alberta, had mixed thoughts about how the shipwreck would affect her sailing future.

"This was only my 15th day at sea. It was definitely a shocker," she said, eyes welling with tears. "At first I was, like, I'm never going back into the ocean. But after thinking about the friendships I made in the raft, I definitely would do it again."

Touching solid land for the first time, Irwin jumped about with her friends and did a little dance on a naval pier, smiling and giggling.

She headed to a waiting bus, and as it pulled out Irwin and the others waved to the Brazilian sailors and shouted out their thanks.


Associated Press Writer Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.

EN FRANCAIS
C'est une solide rafale que le voilier a encaissé. Mais au lieu d'une rafale horizontale, ce fut une rafale verticale. Ce qui fait qu'au plus le bateau gîtait, au plus les voiles portaient. Le bateau a littéralement été poussé dans l'eau et coulé.

Je retiens : les exercices effectués pour quitter le bord, le fait qu'il y avait deux fois trop de canots de sauvetage, que les étudiants étaient en cours et donc tous ensemble, la balise car ils n'ont pas eu le temps d'envoyer un mayday et le sang froid du capitaine.

22 fév. 2010
0

si quelqu'un
a la traduction je suis preneur .
merci

22 fév. 2010
0

Avec untraducteur du net (pour voir)
Article 1
William Curry of Seattle, the ship's captain was in his cabin when he felt the severe heel. His first thought, he recounted, was that it was "pretty normal."
Then, however, the ship kept being pushed further over, and "I knew instantly that it was not right."
Mr. Curry said he had seen bad weather coming -- gale or near-gale winds with thundershowers and high seas. In preparation, he had lowered some of the tall ship's 16 sails, trimmed others, notified the cooks to prepare sandwiches in case thr rolling seas made cooking impossible, and notified the students. Although bad weather was coming, Mr. Curry thought what lay ahead was nothing terribly special: discomforting but not threatening.
Instead, he said, the ship was struck by a micro-burst of a vertical downdraft.
Normally, heavy horizontal winds will cause a sailing boat to heel thereby putting the sails at an angle to spill some of the wind, he explained. A downdraft, by contrast, takes a sail already an angle and pushes it further down, which was Concordia's fate. "The more you go over, the more the sail is exposed to the wind," he said. It was an "extraordinary event," of "bad luck" such that within 15 minutes the ship was over on its side and slowly disappeared.

Article 2
RIO DE JANEIRO — When wind and rough seas drove the Canadian sailing ship carrying dozens of teenage students to lean precariously to one side, the captain figured it was just another day of sailing in rough weather.

When the boat immediately keeled again, he knew it was going down.

"The ship had gone from sailing upright to being on her side in the water in about 15 or 20 seconds," William Curry said. "I knew, of course, that the blow to the ship was fatal and that she was not going to right."

Just like that, a five-month academic dream cruise for 64 young students and crew ended in a mad scramble for life rafts as the SV Concordia was quickly sucked beneath the waves. Back on land Saturday, they recounted how fears of starvation and a lonely death far from land filled their heads during two nightmarish days adrift at sea.

Curry called it a miracle that everyone on board made it into rafts and survived after the three-masted Concordia apparently experienced a weather phenomenon known as a "microburst" — a sudden, violent downdraft of wind — that instantly crippled the vessel Wednesday.

The gust that knocked the ship on its side came so suddenly therewas no time to radio for help before all communications equipment was submerged and ruined. So hope rested on a distress beacon that launched automatically when the vessel capsized.

"My biggest fear was that nobody knew we had sunk," said 17-year-old Keaton Farwell of Toronto. "We thought our signal had failed and nobody knew and it could be weeks before we were saved. The worst life-and-death thoughts were going through our heads, and everybody was panicking."

After 30 hours in life rafts 300 miles (480 kilometers) off Brazil, hope arrived as "a light in the sky" — a Brazilian air force jet flying high overhead sent to search the area after the beacon was finally detected.

"When we saw the plane, we were crying because of happiness. We knew somebody was coming for us, we knew we weren't going to die in a life raft," Farwell said.

Brazil's navy said the distress signal was first picked up about 5 p.m. Thursday, and an air force plane later the spotted rafts. Passing merchant ships plucked the castaways from the water, and by Saturday afternoon they were all back on land in Rio de Janeiro.

The first to dock looked disheveled and teary-eyed, wearing navy caps and clothing borrowed from their rescuers. They smiled brightly at times, but also broke down and cried as they spoke to reporters on the navy frigate that brought them to port.

Curry said the Concordia's crew had begun preparing 24 hours in advance after getting a forecast of rough weather and high seas, but nothing unusual.

"Those conditions are not at all extreme. It's kind of just another day at sea," Curry said. "It was an extraordinary event — just bad luck to be in that tiny patch of ocean at that time."

While his young charges receive extensive sailing training as part of the study program, luck also had a hand in keeping everyone alive.

The storm hit inthe early afternoon at a time when most of the students were studying in protected structures on deck — which made it easier for them to scramble to life rafts.

Two rafts got tangled in the rigging — but the ship's cook had rushed so quickly from her chores that she was still clutching a kitchen knife, which was used to slice through the ropes and free the rafts.

Curry also said the school that operates the ship outfitted it with twice as many life rafts as actually needed for 64 people, so there was plenty of room for everyone even though all the rafts on one side were under water.

The 188-foot (57.5-meter) Concordia was carrying 48 students plus the crew, according to Kate Knight, head of West Island College International of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, which operates the Class Afloat program for students in the final two years of high school and the first year of college.

School officials said 42 of those aboard were from Canada. Knight said others hail from the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Europe and the West Indies.

Nigel McCarthy, president and CEO of the school, said a London-based maritime agency would conduct an investigation to determine why it took so long for the emergency beacon to be heard.

"I'm concerned, I'm concerned," he told The Associated Press. "Obviously we don't know the reality of what's happened at every stage of this process, and we're just thankful to the Brazilian navy for having gone and got them."

Katherine Irwin, a 16-year-old from Calgary, Alberta, had mixed thoughts about how the shipwreck would affect her sailing future.

"This was only my 15th day at sea. It was definitely a shocker," she said, eyes welling with tears. "At first I was, like, I'm never going back into the ocean. But after thinking about the friendships I made in the raft, I definitely would do it again."

Touching solid land for the first time, Irwin jumped about with her friends and did a little dance on a naval pier, smiling and giggling.

She headed to a waiting bus, and as it pulled out Irwin and the others waved to the Brazilian sailors and shouted out their thanks.


Associated Press Writer Rob Gillies in Toronto contributed to this report.

EN FRANCAIS
C'est une solide rafale que le voilier a encaissé. Mais au lieu d'une rafale horizontale, ce fut une rafale verticale. Ce qui fait qu'au plus le bateau gîtait, au plus les voiles portaient. Le bateau a littéralement été poussé dans l'eau et coulé.

Je retiens : les exercices effectués pour quitter le bord, le fait qu'il y avait deux fois trop de canots de sauvetage, que les étudiants étaient en cours et donc tous ensemble, la balise car ils n'ont pas eu le temps d'envoyer un mayday et le sang froid du capitaine.

22 fév. 2010
0

ok, merci pour la référence
c'est donc normal qu'à 90 degrés il ne revienne pas

22 fév. 2010
0

Stabilité
Il serait intéressant de connaître la courbe de stabilité du bato. Les clippers chaviraient vers 55°/60° de gite, rien à voir avec nos AVS de 120°....

22 fév. 2010
0

tu as l'essentiel sur l'accident dans la mini trado de qques lignes
le reste est surtout composé de témoignages des survivants

je me souviens d'un film vu aus etats unis qui s'appelait "white squall" et qui montrait quelque chose comme cela

un peu surprenant quand meme cette rafale verticale violente, l'étude de stabilité du bateau n'avait peut etre pas imaginé qu'il serait un jour couché à 90 degrés

ça été vraiment chaud, la moitié des bibs était inutilisable, le bateau était couché à 90 % et ils n'ont rien pu prendre !!

22 fév. 2010
0

Instead, he said, the ship was struck by a micro-burst of a vertical downdraft.
c'est ce qu'on appelle dans le vol libre un devil's dust, très courant en montagne et très redouté sur les décollages situés en montagne: un tourbillon de vents violents :
une mini tornade.

22 fév. 2010
0

En fait
Un squall (couramment utilisé dans le jargon des marins québécois) est en fait un grain (et non une lame de fond). Nous l'utilisons pour nommer un coup de vent subit sous une cellule orageuse. Fréquent dans l'estuaire et le golfe du Saint-Laurent.

Pour ce qui est du film amarequin White Squall, le titre a été traduit par Rafale blanche dans la version française.

23 fév. 2010
0

voilà la microburst

23 fév. 201016 juin 2020
0

Microburst
Illustration manuel NASA :

23 fév. 2010
0

Pilote
Pour celui qui est en finale, ça va encore, par contre le pôv gars qui essaye de décoller...

23 fév. 2010
0

Peut-être...
...mais il vaut mieux être au sol avec l'envie d'être en l'air, qu'en l'air avec l'envie d'être au sol !

23 fév. 2010
0

un peu
comme on dit à l'atterrissage bien que l'avion soit toujours en l'air

23 fév. 2010
0

C'est pour celà...
que dans les rapport d'accidents de la DGAC il y avait, il y a une dizaine d'années: "Collision en vol avec un mouton"
Non ce n'est pas une blague.

23 fév. 2010
0

Curieux!
Il semble que deux titres différents aient été utilisés: Rafale blanche au Québec (voir le lien) et Lame de fond ailleurs.

www.boxofficequebec.com[...]00.php3

24 fév. 2010
0

Oui, mais ...
Concordia était un bateau récent (1992) qui répondait probablement aux normes actuelles.

La stabilité de ce type de bateau est assurée en grande partie par le lest intérieur. Peut-être a-t-il ripé ?

24 fév. 2010
0

le wasa en suede au 16 eme ou 17 eme siecle
avient chaviré à sa premiere sortie du port, en plus avec le poids des canons ...

22 fév. 2010
0

White squall
Film impressionnant,(lame de Fond) en français, avec pas mal de morts (6)il me semble !

22 fév. 2010
0

un autre commentaire d'un pilote
cest exactement pareil que le film ' white squall'!

Les microbursts sortent a la base de cummunolimbus vers la planéte et s'étend sur la surface a jusqu' à 5 kilometres a forte puissance.

Eux, ils étaient directement en dessous. malchanceux

23 fév. 2010
0

différent
d'une tornade:

23 fév. 201016 juin 2020
0

White squall
Le titre dans la version française est bien "Lame de Fond".
Ma fille me l'avait offert, mais je ne l'ai pas conservé dans mes archives de bateau!

23 fév. 2010
0

Ouah!
Je n'aimerai pas être à la place du pilote qui est en finale !

23 fév. 2010
0

les deux
posent de graves soucis, je suppose

23 fév. 2010
0

oui
mais dès que tu as les roues en l'air tu n'es plus au sol et pourtant bien au décollage ;-)

23 fév. 2010
0

Mais
depuis "le petit Prrince", chacun sait qu'un mouton peut se retrouver bien haut :-D

24 fév. 2010
0

L'HERMIONE
Ces voiliers traditionnels ont une courbe de stabilité faible.

Pour la frégate l'Hermione en construction à Rochefort, c'est encore pire.

Si l'on respecte les normes de sécurité actuelle, elle sera interdite à la navigation à la voile.

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